IMPORTANT NOTICES

For patients required to wait 20 minutes after allergy shots, please wait either in the building hallway or their car (varies by location). Call the office when your 20 minutes is up. Nurses will notify patients who must wait in the office after their allergy shots. We are not equipped to diagnose influenza or coronavirus. … Read more

New Drug Treatments In Allergy

There are many new medications and treatments for allergies and asthma. Board- certified allergists have the training and experience to help patients make the best choices. * New antihistamines. Histamine is one of the major inflammatory chemicals released by cells in the body during allergic reactions, and antihistamines block its action. Older antihistamines, such as … Read more

Eczema and Food Allergies

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin condition which is characterized by patches of red, scaling, very itchy skin. It can occur in any age group but is more common in young children. There is a vicious cycle in which itching leads to scratching, which in turn leads to more itching. Skin … Read more

Allergy Drops: Not Yet Ready

For many years allergists have been searching for alternatives to allergy shots that successfully desensitize patients to the substances to which they are allergic. While allergy shots are very effective, the fear of injections deters some patients from undergoing the therapy. Recent research in Europe shows that oral allergy drops can desensitize patients to certain … Read more

Allergic Skin Rashes

Allergies may be the underlying cause of a variety of skin rashes. These include hives, contact rashes and eczema. Hives are raised, red, itchy welts on the skin. Allergies to food, antibiotics, soaps and cosmetics, insect bites and environmental allergens such as animal danders can cause hives. Non-allergic factors such as pressure on the skin, … Read more

Advantages of Allergy Shots

IMPORTANT COVID-19 NOTICES:
1) All patients coming for allergy shots or office visits should phone ahead to verify that the office is open and shots are available.
2) Call the office again when you arrive, for directions as to when and how to enter the office (varies by location).
3) Only a limited number of people are allowed in the waiting room due to social distancing (varies by office).
4) Most patients may wait their 20 minutes after allergy shots either in the building hallway or their car (varies by location). Call the office when your 20 minutes is up. Nurses will notify patients who must wait in the office after their allergy shots.
5) For annual and other non-acute visits, we are adopting telemedicine where a physician will review your progress with you during a videoconference using Zoom. To use this, patients must have either a smart phone or a laptop or desktop computer with a camera and microphone.
6) We are not equipped to diagnose influenza or coronavirus. If you have cough and fever we ask that you refrain from coming to the office. In the office nurses are triaging over the phone whether an ill patient should come to our office or see their primary physician.

Skin Tests Tell the Story

Skin testing is the most sensitive and least expensive way to identify specific allergies. Newer ways of performing the skin test minimize patient discomfort. Scratch tests may be used on people of any age to screen for allergies and detect those individuals who are super-sensitive. To perform the scratch test, a drop of allergen solution … Read more

Allergies on the Increase

The incidence of allergies and related conditions such as asthma and food allergies is increasing around the world. It is estimated that up to 1 in 3 people are allergic to one or more substances (allergens) at some point in their lives. Hayfever, which was first recognized in England over a century ago, used to … Read more